Caring for Cattle

This category is for caring for your cattle.

  • Tips for Raising a Herd Bull--Heat, fencing, and knowing your bull

    When raising a young bull on your farm, be very careful with how you handle him. Here is part 2 on Tips for Raising a Herd Bull. Be sure to check out tips 1 through 4. 5. Move the bull with grain. We've taught all our cows to come to grain. This helps with moving them. You can do this with a bull too, and it simplifies moving, loading, and unloading the bull. 6. Watch for cows in heat All bets for normal behavior are off when a cow is in heat. Stay out of the field and never get between...
  • Keeping Cows Cool in Hot Weather

    Even though the end of summer is drawing near, there are still at least four more weeks of hot weather for most areas. In places like Georgia, Texas, Florida and other parts of the South, the heat may hang on through early October. Because cattle have a giant fermenting vat in their bodies in the form of their rumen, they are uncomfortably hot at much lower temperatures than people are. Even at rest, a cow will be generating heat, merely by the action of her rumen digesting her food. By...
  • Low-Stress Cattle Handling Techniques

    It\'s spring. For our family, this means that we have a few beef cattle chores to take care of. We have to pregnancy check our mature cows, give some shots, worm the animals, and in general, make a thorough health evaluation of every cow, calf, bull, and steer on the farm. To do this, we have to corral the animals, run them through our chute, and capture them in the headgate. The cows aren\'t too fond of this, but it is something that must be done. Over the years, we\'ve learned to handle...
  • Do you have enough Acreage?

    Many people are moving into cattle raising to help supplement their grocery budgets, but also to make sure they can control what goes into their food and drink. It's not easy raising cattle, but often it's better than the alternative of super markets and their offerings. Brent from Texas has 10 acres, 10 goats, and 50 chickens. He joined up to see if there was any way he could add some cattle to the mix, and he just might! [URL]http://www.cattleforum.com/showthread.php?t=8[/URL]
  • Cold Winter Means The Need for Wind Barriers

    Wind is not your friend in the winter. Every blast of cold air strips the heat right off you. On top of heat loss it is very unpleasant. It is one of the things that makes me want to stay South in the Winter. As winter approaches wind will become a factor for cattle. I cannot speak for cattle, but my guess is wind is no fun for them either. This is especially true if they are exposed for any period of time. Obviously a wind barrier is a necessity. This is an obvious point. What is less...
  1. Keeping Cows Cool in Hot Weather

    Even though the end of summer is drawing near, there are still at least four more weeks of hot weather for most areas. In places like Georgia, Texas, Florida and other parts of the South, the heat may hang on through early October. Because cattle have a giant fermenting vat in their bodies in the form of their rumen, they are uncomfortably hot at much lower temperatures than people are. Even at rest, a cow will be generating heat, merely by the action of her rumen digesting her food. By...
  2. Calf Health-Navel Ill and Joint Ill

    Navel ill occurs when bacteria invade the umbilical cord of a newborn calf. This malady can be prevented by using clean calving practices and dipping the navel in a disinfectant solution. However, sometimes, despite all of the precautions that a farmer may take, a calf can come down with navel ill. The infection could stay in the external part of the umbilical cord. Yet, at times it travels through the cord and into the abdominal cavity of the calf through the blood vessels that lie in this...
  3. Low-Stress Cattle Handling Techniques

    It\'s spring. For our family, this means that we have a few beef cattle chores to take care of. We have to pregnancy check our mature cows, give some shots, worm the animals, and in general, make a thorough health evaluation of every cow, calf, bull, and steer on the farm. To do this, we have to corral the animals, run them through our chute, and capture them in the headgate. The cows aren\'t too fond of this, but it is something that must be done. Over the years, we\'ve learned to handle...
  4. Tips for Raising a Herd Bull--Heat, fencing, and knowing your bull

    When raising a young bull on your farm, be very careful with how you handle him. Here is part 2 on Tips for Raising a Herd Bull. Be sure to check out tips 1 through 4. 5. Move the bull with grain. We've taught all our cows to come to grain. This helps with moving them. You can do this with a bull too, and it simplifies moving, loading, and unloading the bull. 6. Watch for cows in heat All bets for normal behavior are off when a cow is in heat. Stay out of the field and never get between...
  5. Weaning Your Bottle Calf

    Weaning Bottle Calves The first big milestone for your bottle calf is weaning. Weaning can take place as early as a month of age, but I wouldn't recommend weaning that early unless it is unavoidable. Every week that you can give your calf milk or milk replacer puts him in a stronger, healthier position to handle the stress of weaning. Usually calves are given six to eight weeks on milk or milk replacer before the owner weans them. Of course if you are buying milk replacer you probably...
  6. How to Raise a Bottle Calf

    Raising bottle calves can be a good way of starting your herd. However, there is also an element of risk to it because young calves are very vulnerable to illness. Where to get your calves Sometimes you will have no choice about raising a bottle calf if the mother died giving birth. The calf may be stressed from a traumatic birth, so you must keep it warm and dry. Getting calves from a neighboring farm or dairy is another good way of finding bottle calves. Ask the owner if the calves have...
  7. Cold Winter Means The Need for Wind Barriers

    Wind is not your friend in the winter. Every blast of cold air strips the heat right off you. On top of heat loss it is very unpleasant. It is one of the things that makes me want to stay South in the Winter. As winter approaches wind will become a factor for cattle. I cannot speak for cattle, but my guess is wind is no fun for them either. This is especially true if they are exposed for any period of time. Obviously a wind barrier is a necessity. This is an obvious point. What is less...
  8. Do you have enough Acreage?

    Many people are moving into cattle raising to help supplement their grocery budgets, but also to make sure they can control what goes into their food and drink. It's not easy raising cattle, but often it's better than the alternative of super markets and their offerings. Brent from Texas has 10 acres, 10 goats, and 50 chickens. He joined up to see if there was any way he could add some cattle to the mix, and he just might! [URL]http://www.cattleforum.com/showthread.php?t=8[/URL]
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