Cattle dogs?

Discussion in 'General Cattle Discussion' started by Megan, Nov 22, 2013.

  1. Megan

    Megan New Member

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    I've heard of them, and wonder if people use them these days. And what do they do when they are being the cattle dog?
     
  2. GrumpyFarms

    GrumpyFarms New Member

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    We use Australian Shepard's. We never taught them a lick. They gather up our chickens & ducks that go astray. Even our Scottish Highlander. They play together a lot. They even get our kids inline if they don't listen to us. I mean if the kids start to argue with us the dogs will growl at them and since they don't want to get bit, the kids mind us better. ImageUploadedByCattle Forum1385180688.573865.jpg ImageUploadedByCattle Forum1385180724.087609.jpg
    As you can tell its late and they're tired. Our little female Angel and her older brother Andrew chaste after a rabbit when they were younger. As you can see in the picture she lost a leg when she ran into the road. She doesn't do that anymore.
     

  3. Megan

    Megan New Member

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    Grumpy thanks for sharing Andrew and Angel with me. They seem to be an asset to your home and cattle workings, even the human children cattle :)

    It's a shame Angel lost that leg, but good to see that it does not stop her.

    Grumpy - how many cows/cattle does Angel and Andrew take care of?
     
  4. Alice

    Alice New Member

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    Have they ever had to actually nip the children?

    But they do sound valuable part of your working family.

    How did you choose them, what you would suggest one should look for when choosing a dog to do such work?
     
  5. GrumpyFarms

    GrumpyFarms New Member

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    Megan, and Alice. our dogs are awesome. The only kids they gave nipped are my two adopted girls. They are my lite sisters daughters. She died in a car wreck. The kids cams from a really bad place in West Virginia. There dad is in prison and they are very much like him. The dogs don't like being kicked or to be beat. So the dogs fight back to protect themselves. It's been about a year since a bite has happened. If they growl. The kids stop and listen. Remember we are a rescue farm. So we personally have only LD our mini steer, butt we are surrounded by farms as far as you can see. Our friends also like to use our dogs to help them. They on the the other hand have well over 200 head each.
     
    Last edited: Nov 26, 2013
  6. Megan

    Megan New Member

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    Grumpy that's terrible that the dogs had to nip due to the children's bad behavior. Nice that the neighbors appreciate the help your dogs can and do give.
     
  7. GrumpyFarms

    GrumpyFarms New Member

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    Kids need to learn that dogs have feeling and don't like being kicked. Sometimes it takes a little bight to get the kids to mind.
     
  8. rrachell_llynn

    rrachell_llynn New Member

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    Megan, I have two Australian cattle dogs but they are not used for herd management. I do, however live across the field from one of the oldest weekly running rodeos in the country. The owner has, for as long as I can remember, used his heelers to move his bucking stock from field to field and remove bulls from the arena during the rodeo. The original heeler, named Buddy, had quite a fan club.
     
  9. cattle

    cattle Administrator Staff Member

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    What's the name of the rodeo?
     
  10. rrachell_llynn

    rrachell_llynn New Member

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    Cowtown Rodeo in Southern New Jersey.
     
  11. dnsnthegrdn

    dnsnthegrdn New Member

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    Cattle dogs can be a huge asset to the farm. But you have to teach them and train them. You don't want a happy go lucky dog causing a stampede and causing the herd to go through a fence. (had this happen) Nor do you want the cattle to get spooked and break a leg. Broke leg = dead animal. Cattle dogs have natural abilities that will give them a good foundation to get the job done naturally. Making training so much easier. We have a Border Collie and a Blue Heeler pups. The Border Collie will work the neighbors horses and now the Blue Heeler's instincts are kicking in. These horses are used to dogs so they are not frightened when they see two dogs rushing up on them.

    I hear it a lot, the dogs will learn it naturally but this is a dangerous way to go about it for the livestock and dogs alike. One swift kick to the head and fido is dead. The dogs need to be well trained to sit and stay, down, etc., for their own protection as well as the livestock.

    We adopted a two year old Border Collie, that harassed the neighbors horses biting and pulling on their tails and caused the stampede with our cattle. The previous owner swore she was trained and came from a long line of working dogs.

    Cattle dogs are amazing when trained and can make your job so much more efficient. But they have to be trained.

    The livestock get trained to the dogs just as much as the dogs do. Go on you tube and watch some of thses dogs at work. They can do some amazing stuff. When my ol' man was younger he worked at the stock yards and said he didn't have to do a thing. His old Blue Heeler would do his work for him.
     
  12. RanchWife

    RanchWife New Member

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    People in western nebraska use cow dogs a lot. They mostly just run along with the horses and keep the herd moving which can be very helpful in the back on a 8 mile cattle drive. They have to be well trained or they will be more harm then help. They're also trained to jump in every tank they come to which is essential so they don't over heat. Really well trained dogs can help you sort stock. We have dog trials at our local fair. It can be funny as some aren't trained so well and this one guys dog ran out of the arena every time he turned his back.
     
  13. Jonny

    Jonny Beef Farmer

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    I use a kelpie for my mustering and yard work. Adopted her at 15 months old and lived with an old lady. Never seen a cow in her life.
    I didn't adopt her thinking she would be any good. I just saw a nice dog.
    Did some yard work the following night and she pushed all the cattle through the race by herself.
    ImageUploadedByCattle Forum1392206609.702927.jpg
     
  14. ranchhand

    ranchhand New Member

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    I had a red Queensland heeler I taught him down come back and that that's enough and leave it... He was a natural herder from the day I got him at 6 weeks old he new what cows were best working dog I've ever had and haven't been able to find another to match him since
     
  15. saskcattle

    saskcattle New Member

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    My dad uses border collies for cattle if you get a good dog they are better than having 3 people helpin you. I have a young blue healer border collie cross I'm training right now. Very smart