Can you make a living with Cattle

Discussion in 'General Cattle Discussion' started by BoldVenture, Feb 7, 2015.

  1. BoldVenture

    BoldVenture New Member

    71
    0
    0
    I have a kinda broad question... Is it possible to make a living with Cattle? In any way... Raising them, finishing them out, buying for other people, trading etc... Any ideas or input?


    Bold Venture Farms
    Buffalo Valley, TN
     
  2. rene

    rene New Member

    297
    0
    0
    Yes u can.
     

  3. BoldVenture

    BoldVenture New Member

    71
    0
    0
    Ok that's encouraging. :). Do you have any insight?


    Bold Venture Farms
    Buffalo Valley, TN
     
  4. SupaDexta

    SupaDexta Cattleman

    26
    0
    0
    Couple hundred mommas, or couple thousand feeders, or milk a 100 or 2 should get you started.
     
  5. BoldVenture

    BoldVenture New Member

    71
    0
    0
    Couple hundred mommas or a couple thousand feeders sound good. Not interested in milking lol


    Bold Venture Farms
    Buffalo Valley, TN
     
  6. BoldVenture

    BoldVenture New Member

    71
    0
    0
    I've just heard so many people say you cannot make a good living with Cattle anymore... Well, farming of any kind actually.


    Bold Venture Farms
    Buffalo Valley, TN
     
  7. SupaDexta

    SupaDexta Cattleman

    26
    0
    0
    Depends how fancy you wanna live and how well you manage the place.
     
  8. BoldVenture

    BoldVenture New Member

    71
    0
    0
    True... I wonder is there anyone on this forum that makes a full time living farming?


    Bold Venture Farms
    Buffalo Valley, TN
     
  9. Townline-Angus

    Townline-Angus New Member

    11
    0
    0
    It depends on how many you wish to raise and how. Since you're not interested in milking, that leaves dairy replacements, beef for sale to customers through various ways, beef calves to other start ups or to the beef auctions. You will need to raise at least 50 to have any type of income and you will also need another job somewhere to live decent or raise at least 100 cattle if you don't have another job. I raise Angus beef cattle and still in the start up phase with 21 right now. I plan to raise 100 total with myself working another self employed job and my wife working full time as well. I have other friends who raise Angus and make a decent income but also work outside the farm. As of right now, I want to start cutting my own hay eventually, but I can buy it and still make about $200 per calf when they reach 500 lbs at the current price for feeders. If you could cut all your own hay, that would increase about $300 to profit a total of $500 per calf after expenses. Now, the difficult part is coming up with the money to start farming. The average cost is a million dollars invested to raise 100 cattle. You could also just cut hay and sell the feed without raising cows or you could go to auctions and local farmers to buy calves and send them to one of the areas higher paying auction places or advertise the feeder calves for replacements. Some farmers prefer to just sell to an individual like that so they don't take a hit at the auction houses due to the feedlot buyers not showing up for some reason. It's guaranteed money for the farmer. For instance, if the current auction houses are in the $1.70 to $2 price range per lb. for 500 lb. calves, these feeder buyers will typically pay the low end at $1.70 and sell them for $2.20 to feedlots or other area buyers. That will result in less investment to you with immediate returns. Good luck
     
  10. BoldVenture

    BoldVenture New Member

    71
    0
    0
    Very good info and suggestions townline. Thanks! I've actually been playing around with a few head buying at the sale cheap, but I've had pretty bad luck so far with getting them healthy... I'm buying them right but I just lost 2 big black calves. :/. Kinda discouraging.


    Bold Venture Farms
    Buffalo Valley, TN
     
  11. Townline-Angus

    Townline-Angus New Member

    11
    0
    0
    Don't buy cheap unhealthy looking cows or calves. They can have diseases like BVD or Johne's that will infect your entire herd. They will die from these diseases, there's no cure for these things. Try to buy healthy calves from a closed herd from a local farmer. It might be a little more money, but if you buy good 500 lb. calves to start a breeding stock herd from a closed herd, then you will be farther ahead not dealing with diseases coming through the auction houses. Just make sure the farmer is someone you trust and hasn't brought any cows in his place in several years. Vaccinate and worm your herd. Do not buy any until you get rid of anything you have now and put the new herd in a separate area for at least a year so you can be sure not to infect the new herd with diseases the others might of had. Do not buy newborn calves and try to bottle feed them. It's very difficult to raise them that way. They take longer to grow and can get scours very easy from the formula, temperature, and feeding times must be the same everyday.
     
  12. rene

    rene New Member

    297
    0
    0
    We just sold some black fiiiine heifers weighed at about 400lb over 1000$ each. But its crazy to buy expensive cows
     
  13. BoldVenture

    BoldVenture New Member

    71
    0
    0
    That's all good advice townline. Of course you can't buy calves at the sale and flip them at another sale like you mentioned in your last post without buying at the sale... What's the best way to disinfect my barn? Bleach?


    Bold Venture Farms
    Buffalo Valley, TN
     
  14. BoldVenture

    BoldVenture New Member

    71
    0
    0
    That's actually not a bad price rene... Good black Calves in the 150-400lb range are bringing $3 at the sale barns here.


    Bold Venture Farms
    Buffalo Valley, TN
     
  15. Markwright

    Markwright Junior Member

    168
    0
    0
    Yes U can. U gonna Have

    to Love Cattle though.

    Any kinda Smooth runnin cow calf deal makes dough ( 300 cows is best....but 25 cows makes plenty of dough 2 )

    your biggest expense is feed....get that down to bout $0 .....there may even be folks in your neighborhood that can save a Lot of Tax dough by owning a couple cows...and you run ( or partner ) nother 100 head on their dirt, AND they Pay U say 10 to $200 per cow per year to manicure the place with mostly Your cows.

    also diversify...run some sheep and goats with your cows.

    perhaps get into sourcing livestock for other folks too.
    ...


     
    Last edited: Feb 16, 2015
  16. rene

    rene New Member

    297
    0
    0
    There is always overhead cost. Nothing is $0
     
  17. Townline-Angus

    Townline-Angus New Member

    11
    0
    0
    BoldVenture, What I was referring to was keeping a breeding stock to raise and sell calves or buy calves at auctions and send them directly to feedlots. It's a different way to make money and personally I wouldn't buy calves at a sale barn then bring them into my own herd. Bleach will help clean disinfect your barn but there might be other things available at your farm supply store like Tractor Supply.
     
  18. BoldVenture

    BoldVenture New Member

    71
    0
    0
    I gotcha townline. Thankfully I haven't turned anything I've bought at the sale out on my pastures... They've been in the barn and or in a pen next to the barn in quarantine. I've decided to sell them and clean everything and start over.


    Bold Venture Farms
    Buffalo Valley, TN
     
  19. BoldVenture

    BoldVenture New Member

    71
    0
    0
    Very good ideas markwright! I love cattle and farming in general. I've been thinking of running some Dorper sheep with my cattle. I don't think I could get anyone to pay me to run my cattle on their land... Around here people pay to lease cattle land.


    Bold Venture Farms
    Buffalo Valley, TN
     
  20. Townline-Angus

    Townline-Angus New Member

    11
    0
    0
    Vaccinate, test your herd for any diseases every year until your absolutely sure after 4 or 5 years of bringing in any type of livestock you don't have any diseases. Doing this, you will be sure to protect your investment and have the proof when selling calves to others that the entire herd is disease free and demand top dollar for those calves. No one wants to take a chance with a diseased cow or calf coming into a herd and you can see why. Try to find a farmer who also has a closed herd and has tested to be sure they don't have a diseased animal to set you back. If you stay on this course, you will make good money. Do not believe anyone because a single animal will cause you to lose all of them if it's a disease carrier like BVD or Johnes.